Make Mother’s Day Last A Month

Take time for yourself and book your screenings this month. Do it for you, do it for them.Make Mother's Day Last A Month

Screening tests:

Screening tests Ages 18–39 Ages 40–49 Ages 50–64 Ages 65 and older
Blood pressure test Get tested at least every 2 years if you have normal blood pressure (lower than 120/80).

Get tested once a year if you have blood pressure between 120/80 and 139/89.

Discuss treatment with your doctor or nurse if you have blood pressure 140/90 or higher.

Get tested at least every 2 years if you have normal blood pressure (lower than 120/80).

Get tested once a year if you have blood pressure between 120/80 and 139/89.

Discuss treatment with your doctor or nurse if you have blood pressure 140/90 or higher.

Get tested at least every 2 years if you have normal blood pressure (lower than 120/80).

Get tested once a year if you have blood pressure between 120/80 and 139/89.

Discuss treatment with your doctor or nurse if you have blood pressure 140/90 or higher.

Get tested at least every 2 years if you have normal blood pressure (lower than 120/80).

Get tested once a year if you have blood pressure between 120/80 and 139/89.

Discuss treatment with your doctor or nurse if you have blood pressure 140/90 or higher.

Bone mineral density test
(osteoporosis screening)
    Discuss with your doctor or nurse if you are at risk of osteoporosis. Get this test at least once at age 65 or older.

Talk to your doctor or nurse about repeat testing.

Breast cancer screening
(mammogram)
  Discuss with your doctor or nurse. Starting at age 50, get screened every 2 years. Get screened every 2 years through age 74.

Age 75 and older, ask your doctor or nurse if you need to be screened.

Cervical cancer screening
(Pap test)
Get a Pap test every 3 years if you are 21 or older and have a cervix.

If you are 30 or older, you can get a Pap test and HPV test together every 5 years.

Get a Pap test and HPV test together every 5 years if you have a cervix. Get a Pap test and HPV test together every 5 years if you have a cervix. Ask your doctor or nurse if you need to get a Pap test.
Cholesterol test Starting at age 20, get a cholesterol test regularly if you are at increased risk for heart disease.

Ask your doctor or nurse how often you need your cholesterol tested.

Get a cholesterol test regularly if you are at increased risk for heart disease.

Ask your doctor or nurse how often you need your cholesterol tested.

Get a cholesterol test regularly if you are at increased risk for heart disease.

Ask your doctor or nurse how often you need your cholesterol tested.

Get a cholesterol test regularly if you are at increased risk for heart disease.

Ask your doctor or nurse how often you need your cholesterol tested.

Colorectal cancer screening
(using fecal occult blood testing, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy)
    Starting at age 50, get screened for colorectal cancer.

Talk to your doctor or nurse about which screening test is best for you and how often you need it.

Get screened for colorectal cancer through age 75.

Talk to your doctor or nurse about which screening test is best for you and how often you need it.

Diabetes screening Get screened for diabetes if your blood pressure is higher than 135/80 or if you take medicine for high blood pressure. Get screened for diabetes if your blood pressure is higher than 135/80 or if you take medicine for high blood pressure. Get screened for diabetes if your blood pressure is higher than 135/80 or if you take medicine for high blood pressure. Get screened for diabetes if your blood pressure is higher than 135/80 or if you take medicine for high blood pressure.

http://www.womenshealth.gov/screening-tests-and-vaccines/screening-tests-for-women/

Don’t Tax Your Health

tax your healthNow that Tax Season is here, you are focused on deadlines, finances, and everyday life but don’t let these tax your health. Make sure to follow these simple health tips:

  • Deduct the soda in your diet. Are you a soda drinker? Did you know that if you drink just one can of soda a day, it will increase your chance of diabetes by 30%?
  • Exempt processed foods such as hot dogs, lunch meats, sausage, and prepared meals from your diet. These usually contain lots of sodium and saturated fats that can lead to high cholesterol.
  • Interest -make your food and drinks more interesting with spices and reap the rewards. Cinnamon can reduce your sugar cravings and regulate your blood sugar. Cumin can help lower blood glucose levels and act as an antibacterial agent. Ginger acts as an anti-inflammatory for arthritis and can bring relief for coughs and congestion.
  • Contributions – contribute exercise to your daily habits to raise your HDL levels (the good or “Happy” cholesterol). This will reward your body by building your heart muscles, burning fat, and reducing stress.
  • Earnings- you have earned yourself a time out. Plan some time in your day for a stress relieving activity such as walking, yoga, meditation, listening to soft music, or taking a nap.
  • Deferred -defer that next alcoholic drink by ordering a glass of water with every drink.
  • TurboFlax – add flaxseeds to your oatmeal or salads for a heart healthy supplement containing fiber, antioxidants, and Omega-3 fatty acids.

Congratulations, you are now on track to move to the next health bracket!

Resources:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/11/10/spices-health_n_1085099.html
http://health.usnews.com/health-news/diet-fitness/diabetes/articles/2010/10/27/even-1-soda-a-day-can-hike-your-diabetes-risk

http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/benefits-of-flaxseed

The Best Valentine’s Gift

As February approaches, we remember Valentine’s Day. Can you think of the best Valentine’s gift you received or that you gave to your Valentine? Wouldn’t it be a great idea to give the gift of health? This year give yourself the best present, a gift of a healthy heart. February is also known as Heart Health Month so let’s focus on a few simple ideas on ways to keep your heart healthy.

Change your plate, lose some weight– One of the best suggestions I have received regarding diet and nutrition was to reduce my plate size. At dinner I use a lunch plate instead of a dinner plate and surprisingly it fills me up. Have you ever heard the term “eat everything on your plate, there are starving children all over the world”. That has been ingrained in us since childhood and to this day I feel guilty leaving food on my plate. One way to curb the guilt is to use a smaller plate. Or if you are eating out, ask for a box when you order and place half of your food in the to-go box as soon as the meal arrives.Image

Make your plate a masterpiece- The more colors on your plate, the more variety of vitamins and minerals, the healthier it is. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (eatright.org) recommend half of your plate consisting of fruits and vegetables. Also, the protein should include lean meats, poultry, beans, eggs, and nuts.  Keep it fun and colorful.

Pack the sack- Do you want to save money and stay healthy? Who doesn’t, right? Then all you need to do is spend a few minutes planning and packing your lunch the night before and this will accomplish both of these. Some examples of easy and nutritious lunches are: baked sweet potato, tuna pita sandwich (with low fat salad dressing, lettuce and tomatoes), carrots and hummus, salad topped with lean proteins,  taco salad (add cubes of mango, red onions, avocado for a burst of flavor), or chicken wraps (rotisserie chicken wrapped in lettuce leaves). Click on the link below for other great lunch ideas.

Happy Heart Month!

Eatright.org
http://www.shape.com/healthy-eating/meal-ideas/10-quick-and-healthy-brown-bag-lunches

What is a RAC?

inspectorRAC (now referred to as a recovery auditor, or RA, by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, or CMS) really is: a corporate entity contracted with CMS to audit payments made to Medicare providers. RAC determines whether they were paid appropriately, entitled to additional payments (in the event of under billing), or subject to recovery and loss of revenue if they billed too much. For this RACs receive a contingency fee of 9 to 12.5 percent of the net funds collected as a result of the errors they detect.
Is your facility prepared, if a RAC shows up at your door? The W3 Healthcare Services Advantage can help you prepare and mitigate your exposure from a RAC audit.

Ten Steps to Setting Successful New Year’s Resolutions

newyear2014

By Michelle May, M.D.
http://www.AmIHungry.com

Whether you are setting personal goals for better health or business goals for getting organized and increasing profit, the key to successful New Year’s Resolutions is to create a strategic plan.  The following ten steps will guide you through the goal setting and achievement process.

1. Assess Your Starting Point:  Take an accurate and detailed assessment of where you are presently relative to the goal you would like to achieve.

2. Consider Your Values:  Goals based on your core principles and values will form a passionate attitude.

3. Dream:  Go for areas that inspire and challenge you.  Project yourself into the future and write down your ideal scenario.

4. Define & Clarify:  Narrow down your goals to those that inspire you the most.  Make them so clear that you can see them, feel them, and measure them.

5. Write it Down:  Write your goals in positive terms using detailed words and/or pictures.  Put them in a place where you will see them often.

6. Develop a Plan:  Set long and short goals, including a timeline with deadlines.  Be flexible and open to new opportunities and paths to your goals but be careful of detours.

7.  Identify Obstacles and Possible Solutions:  Expect setbacks and learn to recover from them.

8.  Create a Support Network: Consider identifying an accountability partner to encourage your continued progress.

9.   Make it Happen: Periodically assess your progress, adjusting your approach and/or modifying goals as necessary.

10. Reward Yourself: Small and large incentives will keep you motivated to reach your short and long term goals.  Keep in mind that the greatest reward is in knowing that you have done your best!

Contact WWW today at 727-522-7777 or by email at tblocker@w3ins.com for a FREE wellness calendar to plan out the new year.

Michelle May, M.D. is a recovered yo-yo dieter, founder of the Am I Hungry?® Mindful Eating Program, and award-winning author of Eat What You Love, Love What You Eat: How To Break Your Eat-Repent-Repeat Cycle.
Copyright Michelle May, M.D.