Children’s Life Insurance: Insuring Their Insurability

Children’s Life Insurance

Parents all over the world have one thing in common; we love our children more than we love ourselves. The smiles that melt your heart, the injuries that make you want to kiss away the pain—we would do any and everything to protect our precious little ones. What about insuring them for the unthinkable? No parent wants to think about their child becoming ill, or worse. As responsible parents, our duty is to prepare for all possible outcomes.

When a parent purchases a child life insurance policy early in life, they are ensuring their child’s insurability. Buying life insurance on a child will remove the following obstacles, each of which will increase their rates or even render them uninsurable if they were to apply once they were older.

  • Developing an adverse medical condition
  • Tobacco use
  • Avocation & Occupation factors
  • Family History – heart disease, cancer, etc.

Children who develop medical conditions will most likely not qualify for life insurance policies later in life, or, at the very least, their premium will increase. Juvenile diabetes is an excellent example. Many who are diagnosed before the age of 10 are now uninsurable. Your children may one day thank you for allowing them to have their own life insurance policy in the event they do become uninsurable. We have a client who shared a story about how her parents purchased a life policy for her when she was a child. Five years ago she had a kidney transplant which left her ineligible for life insurance. She had her first child last year and now, because of the life policy her parents purchased for her, she has protection for her income. Her parents never thought a simple decision made thirty years ago would have helped her in such a profound way.

Policies start at $10 a month for children below 5 years old. Protect your child’s future by calling Abbey Bowersox at 727-522-7777 today.

WWW Awarded Top Place to Work

PrintWallace Welch & Willingham (WWW) is pleased to announce that it has been selected again as one of the Tampa Bay Times Top Workplaces. The determination of Top Workplaces is based solely on employee feedback. A winning combination of competitive compensation (including profit sharing bonuses, a merit program and 401(k) retirement plan with match), robust benefit package, and overall company culture is what makes WWW a Top Workplace.

The employee survey is conducted annually by WorkplaceDynamics, LLC, a leading research firm on organizational health and employee engagement. Walt Grayson, WWW’s Chief Operating Officer, stated, “To be named to the list for second consecutive year confirms that consistency in our message and our actions is as important to employees as compensation and benefits.”

WWW seeks to maintain a healthy and happy staff.  A good work-life balance is important to our employees so it is important to WWW as well. The Top Workplace survey had the following comment: “I am a valued employee. Most management say they are family oriented but W3 actually is. They make employees feel welcome from their first moment. They put on company events for the employees and their families. My peers are friendly and helpful and make you feel wanted. There are no lunch clicks that you can’t sit with. It is a friendly, professional place to work.”

The Tampa Bay Times published the complete list of Top Workplaces on April 12. For more information about the Top Workplaces lists and WorkplaceDynamics, please visit www.topworkplaces.com and www.workplacedynamics.com.

Night Driving Dangers

A little extra caution can go a long way while driving at night

Summer has ended, and while fall and winter have their own pleasures — including camp fires— longer nights mean increased danger on the roads.

You might think you drive just as well at night, but consider this: Even though nighttime driving accounts for just 23% of vehicle miles traveled, more than 50% of fatalities for vehicle occupants 16 and older occur between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m., according to the National Safety Commission (NSC).

Because we’re big advocates for safety at WWW, we thought it would be helpful to take a look at why night driving is more dangerous, and what you can do to decrease that danger.

What’s dangerous about night driving?

  1. Decreased vision. We won’t go into all the biological details, but different parts of the eye (such as iris, pupil and retina) work differently at night. Your peripheral vision is actually slightly improved, but it’s more difficult to focus on objects ahead of you. And traveling between well-lit areas and darker roads creates issues as well.
  2. Driving too fast for your headlights. Depending on vehicle speed and headlight setting, many people “over-drive” their headlights. That means, by the time they see something on the road, it’s too late to stop in time to avoid it.
  3. Impaired judgment. Whether due to drowsiness or the use of alcohol or drugs, it appears that drivers at night often don’t use good judgment. According to the NSC, 66% of fatalities at night involve vehicle occupants who weren’t wearing seat belts.

So what do you do?

Sometimes, there’s no way around driving at night. So here are some tips to help you make a safe trip — whether you’re just running to the store, or you’re headed across town.

  1. Make sure your vehicle’s lights are in good working condition. And not just headlights, but turn signals, taillights, etc.
  2. Avoid speeding. Leave a bigger cushion between you and other cars than you would during daylight hours. Leave yourself more time for the trip.
  3. Be more aware of your surroundings. You shouldn’t be using your phone, messing around with the radio or trying to find something on the floor while you’re on the road anyway — and distractions are even more deadly at night. 

Of course, if you’re not comfortable driving at night, the best thing is to avoid it altogether if possible. There’s nothing wrong with asking for a ride from a trusted safe driver or waiting for the sun to come out!

Contact Us!

 At Wallace Welch & Willingham we can work with you to make sure you’ve got the coverage you need, while at the same time using all possible credits and discounts to make that coverage affordable. Just give us a call at 727-522-7777. We want to help you meet your goals, and make sure what’s important to you is protected!

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

breast cancer awareness
Breast cancer typically produces no symptoms when the tumor is small and most treatable. Therefore, it is very important for women to follow recommended screening guidelines for detecting breast cancer at an early stage, before symptoms develop. When breast cancer has grown to a size that can be felt, the most common physical sign is a painless lump.

There is a website, The National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM), that is  a collaboration of national public service organizations, professional medical associations, and government agencies working together to promote breast cancer awareness, share information on the disease, and provide greater access to services.

If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with cancer, the American Cancer Society has an abundance of great resources to assist you and your caregiver.   For more than 40 years, the American Cancer Society’s Reach to Recovery program has helped people (female and male) cope with their breast cancer experience. This experience begins when someone is faced with the possibility of a breast cancer diagnosis and continues throughout the entire period that breast cancer remains a personal concern. (http://www.cancer.org/treatment/supportprogramsservices/reach-to-recovery) Image courtesy of http://www.nationalbreastcancer.org/

Wear pink this month in honor of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

 

Weight Training has Many Health Benefits

Weight Training has Many Health Benefits

Strength training with resistance bands, barbells, or weight machines will give you results in just after a few sessions. The American Heart Association recommends strength training at least twice a week. Please get approval from your physician before starting any exercise routine.

If you are not sure where to begin, contact a with a fitness professional to learn the right way to do each exercise. Doing each exercise 8 to 12 times is usually enough to work your muscles. Begin with a weight you are comfortable with and increase gradually until your muscles are tired after the 12th repetition.

Two or three 20- or 30-minute weight training sessions every week can result in significant health benefits:

  • Increased muscle mass: Muscle mass naturally decreases with age, but weight training can help reverse the trend.
  • Stronger bones: Strength training increases bone density and reduces the risk of fractures.
  • Joint flexibility: Weight training helps maintain joint flexibility and can reduce the symptoms of arthritis.
  • Weight control: As you gain muscle, your body begins to burn calories more easily, making it easier to control your weight.
  • Balance: Strengthening exercises can increase flexibility and balance as people age, reducing falls and injuries.

Reference: American Cancer Society’s August 2014 Healthy Living Newsletter [news@messages.cancer.org]

Take a Vacation from Work, Not from Your Workout

Take a Vacation from Work, Not from Your WorkoutGoing on vacation? It is good to get away from the grind of a schedule and stress. Use this time to charge up your batteries with daily vacation workouts. Your body will feel more refreshed when you get back. It just takes a little planning and a lot of motivation.

The planning starts when you are packing your suitcase. Don’t forget to pack your running sneakers and your iPod for your music. Download some playlists that will keep you motivated. Also, if you are traveling by plane and you do not have much room in your suitcase you can bring resistance bands (they are available at any Target or sports store). These bands are great for stretching and strength training. While in the airport, don’t sit for hours, get up and walk around the terminals often. Remember you will be sitting for a long plane ride so exercise when you can. Also, check with your hotel to see if they have a fitness center and challenge yourself visit it 30 minutes a day.

If you are not traveling by plane, the staycations are great because you can pack exercise equipment in the car. This could be equipment like yoga mats, kettlebells, push-up bars, pull up bars, stability balls, etc.  Try visiting some parks and nature trails during your staycation. Kayaking, jogging, swimming, and biking are all great summer activities but make sure to hydrate before, during, and after your workouts.

Remember summer is vacation time from work, not your workout!

Festive & Healthy 4th of July Treats!

Festive & Healthy 4th of July Treats!

Three cheers for the red, white, and blue…

Make your plate colorful with bright red, white, and blue fruits and vegetables.

The brighter the color (natural coloring, not dye), the healthier it is.

The red fruits and vegetables contain lycopene and other nutrients that reduce the risk of prostate cancer and tumor growth. They can also help with your blood pressure, reduce bad cholesterol (LDL), and support joint tissue. Examples of these are: red apples, cherries, cranberries, strawberries, red grapes, pomegranate, raspberries, tomatoes, red cabbage, and red peppers.

The white fruits and vegetables contain Vitamin C, potassium, and other nutrients. They can help reduce the risk of colon, breast, and prostate cancers and help boost your immune system. Try to add some bananas, white pears, cauliflower, garlic, parsnips, mushrooms, onions, and shallots to your daily diet. Avoid the white (or bleached) foods such as white breads, rice, or cereals.

Don’t forget to add blue fruits and vegetables to your plate for their nutritional value. Many blue (or indigo) fruits and vegetables contain lutein, vitamin C, fiber, flavonoids, and other nutrients.  Blackberries, blueberries, black currants, and figs will aid in lowering your bad cholesterol (LDL), boost your immune system, fight inflammation, and limit the activity of cancer cells.

So celebrate 4th of July on your plate every day for a healthier you!

Make Father’s Day Last A Month

Make Father's Day Last A Month

The best Father’s Day gift is to give your family a healthy dad. Make this the month to schedule your screenings.

Are you taking responsibility for your health? Do you know all the screenings that are suggested for your age group? To view a checklist of men’s health screenings categorized by age, please click the link below. (If you are in a high risk category or have family medical history, please consult your physician regarding the possibility of earlier screenings.) Do it for them. Do it for your father.

http://www.menshealthnetwork.org/library/pdfs/GetItChecked.pdf

Hurricane Preparedness Sales Tax Holiday

In recognition of Hurricane Awareness there will be a tax free day on certain sale items. The sale this years runs from May 31st to June 8th. Here are some of the items that will be on sale:

Selling for $10 or less:

  • Reusable ice (reusable ice packs)

Selling for $20 or less:Hurricane Preparedness Sales Tax Holiday

  • Any portable self-powered light source
  • Battery-powered flashlights
  • Battery-powered lanterns
  • Gas-powered lanterns (including propane, kerosene, lamp oil, or similar fuel)
  • Tiki-type torches
  • Candles

Selling for $25 or less:

  • Any gas or diesel fuel container (including LP gas and kerosene containers)

Selling for $30 or less:

  • Batteries, including rechargeable batteries and excluding automobile and boat batteries (listed sizes only)
  • AA-cell
  • C-cell
  • D-cell
  • 6-volt
  • 9-volt
  • Coolers (food-storage; nonelectrical)
  • Ice chests (food-storage; nonelectrical)
  • Self-contained first-aid kit (already tax-exempt

Selling for $50 or less:

  • Tarpaulins (tarps)
  • Visqueen, plastic sheeting, plastic drop cloths, and other flexible waterproof sheeting
  • Ground anchor systems
  • Tie-down kits
  • Bungee cords
  • Ratchet straps
  • Radios (self-powered or battery-powered)
  • Two-way radios (self-powered or battery- powered)
  • Weather band radios (self-powered or
  • battery-powered)

Selling for $750 or less:

Portable generators that will be used to provide light, communications, or to preserve food in the event of a power outage

Note: Eligible battery-powered or gas-powered light sources and portable self-powered radios qualify for the exemption even though they may have electrical cords.

Information provided by the Florida Department of Revenue. http://dor.myflorida.com/dor/tips/tip14a01-03.pdf

 


download hurricane prep checklist


Make Mother’s Day Last A Month

Make Mother's Day Last A Month

Take time for yourself and book your screenings this month. Do it for you, do it for them.

Screening tests:

Screening tests Ages 18–39 Ages 40–49 Ages 50–64 Ages 65 and older
Blood pressure test Get tested at least every 2 years if you have normal blood pressure (lower than 120/80).

Get tested once a year if you have blood pressure between 120/80 and 139/89.

Discuss treatment with your doctor or nurse if you have blood pressure 140/90 or higher.

Get tested at least every 2 years if you have normal blood pressure (lower than 120/80).

Get tested once a year if you have blood pressure between 120/80 and 139/89.

Discuss treatment with your doctor or nurse if you have blood pressure 140/90 or higher.

Get tested at least every 2 years if you have normal blood pressure (lower than 120/80).

Get tested once a year if you have blood pressure between 120/80 and 139/89.

Discuss treatment with your doctor or nurse if you have blood pressure 140/90 or higher.

Get tested at least every 2 years if you have normal blood pressure (lower than 120/80).

Get tested once a year if you have blood pressure between 120/80 and 139/89.

Discuss treatment with your doctor or nurse if you have blood pressure 140/90 or higher.

Bone mineral density test
(osteoporosis screening)
Discuss with your doctor or nurse if you are at risk of osteoporosis. Get this test at least once at age 65 or older.

Talk to your doctor or nurse about repeat testing.

Breast cancer screening
(mammogram)
Discuss with your doctor or nurse. Starting at age 50, get screened every 2 years. Get screened every 2 years through age 74.

Age 75 and older, ask your doctor or nurse if you need to be screened.

Cervical cancer screening
(Pap test)
Get a Pap test every 3 years if you are 21 or older and have a cervix.

If you are 30 or older, you can get a Pap test and HPV test together every 5 years.

Get a Pap test and HPV test together every 5 years if you have a cervix. Get a Pap test and HPV test together every 5 years if you have a cervix. Ask your doctor or nurse if you need to get a Pap test.
Cholesterol test Starting at age 20, get a cholesterol test regularly if you are at increased risk for heart disease.

Ask your doctor or nurse how often you need your cholesterol tested.

Get a cholesterol test regularly if you are at increased risk for heart disease.

Ask your doctor or nurse how often you need your cholesterol tested.

Get a cholesterol test regularly if you are at increased risk for heart disease.

Ask your doctor or nurse how often you need your cholesterol tested.

Get a cholesterol test regularly if you are at increased risk for heart disease.

Ask your doctor or nurse how often you need your cholesterol tested.

Colorectal cancer screening
(using fecal occult blood testing, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy)
Starting at age 50, get screened for colorectal cancer.

Talk to your doctor or nurse about which screening test is best for you and how often you need it.

Get screened for colorectal cancer through age 75.

Talk to your doctor or nurse about which screening test is best for you and how often you need it.

Diabetes screening Get screened for diabetes if your blood pressure is higher than 135/80 or if you take medicine for high blood pressure. Get screened for diabetes if your blood pressure is higher than 135/80 or if you take medicine for high blood pressure. Get screened for diabetes if your blood pressure is higher than 135/80 or if you take medicine for high blood pressure. Get screened for diabetes if your blood pressure is higher than 135/80 or if you take medicine for high blood pressure.